CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

by Romola Nuttall Disclaimer: this post will be a grossly incomplete summary of a tremendously rich and engaging panel "Metre and Repertory", which was so full of fascinating facts and questions that I cannot do them justice here. Robert Stagg's 'Metre before Shakespeare', contested prevailing orthodoxy of Shakespeare as creator and chief innovator of blank … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 1: Texts and Places

by Kim Gilchrist The first panel of Before Shakespeare kicked off with four fantastic papers that set the tone and the agenda perfectly by opening up underexplored yet fundamental areas of the sixteenth-century performance industries. Tracey Hill’s paper, “The Theatrical City Revisited,” presented what Hill described as a “revisionist account of the role of the … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 1: Texts and Places

Shakespeare: A knack for following theatrical fashion

Venice. Two faithful friends are pitted against a vengeful moneylender who is out for blood. In a climactic trial scene they proclaim their willingness to die for each other; the moneylender’s revenge rebounds against him when a woman outwits him, and in a further twist of the knife his daughter ends up married to a … Continue reading Shakespeare: A knack for following theatrical fashion

“What is a house?”

Recently, I was lucky enough to attend the Before Shakespeare project’s first Advisory Board meeting. The above question, posed by Dr Andy Kesson, provides a good example of the project’s opening strategy. The board was keen to interrogate long-accepted terminology from the early modern studies toolbox, sometimes with disorientating effects (on this observer, at least) … Continue reading “What is a house?”

An Elizabethan Haunting: Antitheatricality and Playgoing

A haunted theatre these days is a perfect premise for a horror film. It is also, apparently, a backstage reality at a prominent West End venue, the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane—perhaps because it is the oldest surviving and functioning theatre construction in England. There are, of course, old superstitions about the Scottish Play and worries … Continue reading An Elizabethan Haunting: Antitheatricality and Playgoing