Before Conference (and The Woman in the Moon)

Our conference is coming up later this week, and we’re looking forward to the range and diversity of papers, conversions, and performance work that will be descending upon South West London in what we’re all confident will be a rare weekend of British Bank Holiday sun. This short post reflects on some of the issues … Continue reading Before Conference (and The Woman in the Moon)

Lawsuits and Leases at Newington Butts Playhouse

Following Laurie Johnson's introduction to the area, we are thankful to Sally-Beth MacLean for some archival insight into Jerome Savage and the playhouse in our second feature on the Newington Butts Playhouse (with MS images courtesy of The National Archives and Canterbury Cathedral Archives)... *** The early playhouse at Newington Butts continues to elude new … Continue reading Lawsuits and Leases at Newington Butts Playhouse

Putting the might into Marlowe’s (and Nashe’s) mighty line

I was lucky enough to work with Kimberley Sykes' Dido, Queen of Carthage company this week. They'll be performing at the RSC September to October 2017 in what looks set to be something very special. Working with actors is deeply embedded in my own practice as someone working on the early London playhouses; I'm always … Continue reading Putting the might into Marlowe’s (and Nashe’s) mighty line

High and Dry at Newington Butts: The Genesis of the Permanent Playhouse

We are pleased to host the a double-bill of guest posts on the Newington Butts Playhouse. Next week, Sally-Beth MacLean examines issues pertaining to renting the grounds of this early playhouse.  Here, Laurie Johnson, the recent author of the only book devoted to the long-overlooked playhouse, introduces us to the area . . . *** … Continue reading High and Dry at Newington Butts: The Genesis of the Permanent Playhouse

Shakespeare in Scraps: Halliwell-Phillipps and Theatre History

This is the first of two posts thinking about theatre history through particular theatre historians.  Lucy Munro's blog on the Wallaces follows as a companion piece. *** James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps was among the most prominent book collectors and Shakespearean scholars of Victorian England. Halliwell-Phillipps’s (HP’s) biography of Shakespeare, initially published in 1848 and revised throughout his … Continue reading Shakespeare in Scraps: Halliwell-Phillipps and Theatre History

Let me speak to you about my huge words

This is the third of three blogs on attribution. For more, see Shakespeare, attribution and attrition: at tribute zone and Nashe’s attributions. I'm aware that I'm becoming an extremely inferior version of George Lucas, writing an unwanted trilogy of posts about attribution which aren't even the retrospective prequels to something a little better I'd written … Continue reading Let me speak to you about my huge words