Relearning how to learn: potential ideas for scholarly debate

  We've just finished our four-day Before Shakespeare conference, and this blog post is an attempt to report back to the profession more generally about the things that worked or didn't work in the way we ran the event. That will easily feel presumptuous to lots of people, but I guess I've realised our profession … Continue reading Relearning how to learn: potential ideas for scholarly debate

CONFERENCE RESPONSE: Reflections on the Before Shakespeare conference by Stephen Purcell

Theatre history is not so much about establishing fact as it is about embracing uncertainty, a dialogue between competing and sometimes complementary narratives. That seemed to be the guiding principle of this stimulating and exhilarating conference, and one of the central arguments of Bill Ingram’s generous and provocative opening keynote. Indeed, the conference had clearly … Continue reading CONFERENCE RESPONSE: Reflections on the Before Shakespeare conference by Stephen Purcell

CONFERENCE RESPONSE: Of God and Jonson: writing about new things and non-events by Mathew Lyons

I was fortunate to be able to attend some of the superb Before Shakespeare conference at Roehampton last week. I came away with a range of thoughts and ideas, some of which I hope to pursue in one form or another. Perhaps the thing that struck me most, however, was Bill Ingram’s opening talk. Ingram … Continue reading CONFERENCE RESPONSE: Of God and Jonson: writing about new things and non-events by Mathew Lyons

CONFERENCE RESPONSE: After Before Shakespeare by Eoin Price

After Before Shakespeare The Before Shakespeare conference is over. But while the Before Shakespeare project continues, those of us who gathered together in sunny Roehampton at the end of August for four days of presentations and performances are left to contemplate life after Before Shakespeare. Like any good event, the Before Shakespeare conference crackled with … Continue reading CONFERENCE RESPONSE: After Before Shakespeare by Eoin Price

CONFERENCE Panel: Marlowe

by Kim Gilchrist The conference’s special panel on Christopher Marlowe offered a range of approaches to Marlowe’s plays, but all three highlighted themes of subjugation and violence, perhaps hinting at factors that made Marlowe’s plays so shocking and influential when first performed. Nicole Mennell’s paper, “Horsemanship and Governance in Tamburlaine the Great Parts I and … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Marlowe

Go dare; or, how scholarship lost the plot

Warning: contains plot spoilers 'Nothing happens, nobody comes, nobody goes, it's awful'. These lines were not written to describe the plays of John Lyly, but they would make an effective advertising slogan based on the scholarly consensus on his work. Michael Best was the first to identify the playwright's work as 'Lyly's static drama', an … Continue reading Go dare; or, how scholarship lost the plot

CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

by Romola Nuttall Disclaimer: this post will be a grossly incomplete summary of a tremendously rich and engaging panel "Metre and Repertory", which was so full of fascinating facts and questions that I cannot do them justice here. Robert Stagg's 'Metre before Shakespeare', contested prevailing orthodoxy of Shakespeare as creator and chief innovator of blank … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

CONFERENCE Panel: Circulating Stories

by Callan Davies Our fourth panel had a wonderful coherence to it, with all four papers complementing each other in fascinating and provocative ways. First up were two papers on the underappreciated and underdiscussed William Painter and his "play-fodder" (as it has sometimes been dismissed), The Palace of Pleasure (first printed 1566) from Mark Houlahan and … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Circulating Stories