Petruchio’s social status: guest post from Hailey Bachrach

A guest post from Hailey Bachrach's website, Dramatis Personae. I don’t like The Taming of the Shrew, and it’s one of a handful of plays I’ve been avoiding having to write about. But last week, the University of Kent’s Middling Culture Project released a fun Social Status Calculator for determining (as the name suggests) the social status of 16th … Continue reading Petruchio’s social status: guest post from Hailey Bachrach

Roguery in print: crime and culture in early modern London

In celebration of her new book, Lena Liapi writes a guest post on rogues in print. We are delighted that Roguery in Print is now in print! Robert Greene, a writer central to the commercial dramatic developments of the late 1580s and 1590s, was perhaps better known to early modern men and women through his … Continue reading Roguery in print: crime and culture in early modern London

Shakespeare as minor dramatist

One of the concerns of Before Shakespeare is the impact of the canon on contemporary performance, editorial practice and theatre history. Dramatists, like playhouses, are often divided, either explicitly or implicitly, into groups deemed major or minor. Over the next four weeks, we’ll be publishing papers from the 2019 annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association … Continue reading Shakespeare as minor dramatist

Mediators of the wor(l)d: editors, Shakespeare, and inclusion

One of the concerns of Before Shakespeare is the impact of the canon on contemporary performance, editorial practice and theatre history. Dramatists, like playhouses, are often divided, either explicitly or implicitly, into groups deemed major or minor. Over the next four weeks, we’ll be publishing papers from the 2019 annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association … Continue reading Mediators of the wor(l)d: editors, Shakespeare, and inclusion

Minor plays

One of the concerns of Before Shakespeare is the impact of the canon on contemporary performance, editorial practice and theatre history. Dramatists, like playhouses, are often divided, either explicitly or implicitly, into groups deemed major or minor. Over the next four weeks, we’ll be publishing papers from the 2019 annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association … Continue reading Minor plays

What is a minor dramatist? or, three types of minority

One of the concerns of Before Shakespeare is the impact of the canon on contemporary performance, editorial practice and theatre history. Dramatists, like playhouses, are often divided, either explicitly or implicitly, into groups deemed major or minor. Over the next four weeks, we'll be publishing papers from the 2019 annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association … Continue reading What is a minor dramatist? or, three types of minority

Rattling bloody facts; or, why Tamburlaine would make a rubbish boyfriend

I got to see Michael Boyd's production of Tamburlaine last night, a show that focuses as much on the plays' verse as it does on their violence. The production has the most extraordinary and urgent verse speaking I think I've ever heard: fast, fluent and often underscored by the band's rhythmical beat. This blog post is not … Continue reading Rattling bloody facts; or, why Tamburlaine would make a rubbish boyfriend

Losing the Plot: Audiences, Scraps of Performance, and Selective Participation

Further to Andy’s post on story, this post asks questions about the nature and necessity of coherent “story”—and of audiences following “plot”—in early modern commercial dramatic performance. It does so by putting literary and archival material into conversation with archaeological discoveries, and as such I'm thankful to Heather Knight of MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) … Continue reading Losing the Plot: Audiences, Scraps of Performance, and Selective Participation

Authorship studies: where have we got to, and where are we going?

We've been talking about authorship and the way we study it so much on this blog that I've taken a moment to think aloud about where we've got to as a discipline. This post is unusually scholar-facing for me, both in the sense that it's about scholarship and it’s aimed at my colleagues, and it … Continue reading Authorship studies: where have we got to, and where are we going?