Christmas, Newyeares tyde: A summary of works done and attendance given, 2018

The Elizabethan Office of the Revels begins an important section of its yearly account books headed "Christmas, Newyeares tyde, & Twelfetyde" with descriptions of "Woorkes doone & Attendaunce geven Abowte the new making, Translating, ffytting, ffurnishing, garnishing, setting owte & Taking in againe, Making cleane & safe bestowing of sundry kyndes of Apparell properties, ffurniture, & … Continue reading Christmas, Newyeares tyde: A summary of works done and attendance given, 2018

CONFERENCE RESPONSE: After Before Shakespeare by Eoin Price

After Before Shakespeare The Before Shakespeare conference is over. But while the Before Shakespeare project continues, those of us who gathered together in sunny Roehampton at the end of August for four days of presentations and performances are left to contemplate life after Before Shakespeare. Like any good event, the Before Shakespeare conference crackled with … Continue reading CONFERENCE RESPONSE: After Before Shakespeare by Eoin Price

CONFERENCE Panel: Marlowe

by Kim Gilchrist The conference’s special panel on Christopher Marlowe offered a range of approaches to Marlowe’s plays, but all three highlighted themes of subjugation and violence, perhaps hinting at factors that made Marlowe’s plays so shocking and influential when first performed. Nicole Mennell’s paper, “Horsemanship and Governance in Tamburlaine the Great Parts I and … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Marlowe

CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

by Romola Nuttall Disclaimer: this post will be a grossly incomplete summary of a tremendously rich and engaging panel "Metre and Repertory", which was so full of fascinating facts and questions that I cannot do them justice here. Robert Stagg's 'Metre before Shakespeare', contested prevailing orthodoxy of Shakespeare as creator and chief innovator of blank … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 3: Metre and Repertory

CONFERENCE Panel: Circulating Stories

by Callan Davies Our fourth panel had a wonderful coherence to it, with all four papers complementing each other in fascinating and provocative ways. First up were two papers on the underappreciated and underdiscussed William Painter and his "play-fodder" (as it has sometimes been dismissed), The Palace of Pleasure (first printed 1566) from Mark Houlahan and … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Circulating Stories

CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 2: Geographies and People

by Derek Dunne Theatre history isn’t what it used to be. After a stimulating opening plenary by William Ingram entitled ‘What We Talk About When We Talk About Theatre History’, the Before Shakespeare conference continued to challenge/re-negotiate/overturn/burn down everything we think we know about those simple things we call playhouses. The second panel took up … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 2: Geographies and People

CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 1: Texts and Places

by Kim Gilchrist The first panel of Before Shakespeare kicked off with four fantastic papers that set the tone and the agenda perfectly by opening up underexplored yet fundamental areas of the sixteenth-century performance industries. Tracey Hill’s paper, “The Theatrical City Revisited,” presented what Hill described as a “revisionist account of the role of the … Continue reading CONFERENCE Panel: Theatre History 1: Texts and Places

Before Conference (and The Woman in the Moon)

Our conference is coming up later this month, and we’re looking forward to the range and diversity of papers, conversations, and performance work that will be descending upon South West London in what we’re all confident will be a rare weekend of British Bank Holiday sun. This short post reflects on some of the issues … Continue reading Before Conference (and The Woman in the Moon)

Birthday Post: A Year of Before Shakespeare

We launched our website last year, on the date of Shakespeare’s 400th anniversary, with an introduction to the project and something of a provocation in Andy’s post about putting the Shhhh into Shakespeare.... The comments that followed have been matched by recent posts that have engendered debate and discussion amongst readers, including the creation by … Continue reading Birthday Post: A Year of Before Shakespeare