Performing words: introduction to a new thread on theatre and language

This series of posts explores some of the issues raised in our first project publication, the Forum in Shakespeare Studies 45 (2017) devoted to 1580s drama. We are grateful to Diana Henderson and James Siemon for allowing us the opportunity to publish these essays in their journal. See below for links to the full series. When … Continue reading Performing words: introduction to a new thread on theatre and language

“Rent must be paid, duties dischargd”: A Note on Elizabethan Landlords

LISTEN TO THE PODCAST, on THAT SHAKESPEARE LIFE For more on this subject, listen to Callan talking with Cassidy Cash on her recommended podcast series, That Shakespeare Life. While estate agents and others expressed disapproval, others will have welcomed this morning's leaked announcement from the Chancellor's Autumn Statement about announcing a crackdown on letting fees: those administration costs, credit checks, … Continue reading “Rent must be paid, duties dischargd”: A Note on Elizabethan Landlords

The Before Shakespeare Guide to the Elizabethan East End

Summer 1567.  A feature piece for Elizabethan developers, house buyers, tourists, and those interested in keeping up with the latest cultural developments just outside of the City of London.  In this feature, we tell you why it might just be worth buying that coaching inn with the extra land, or finally getting around to doing something … Continue reading The Before Shakespeare Guide to the Elizabethan East End

“Specially youthe”: Regulating London “Venues”

Social media has reacted with frustration and resentment at the news this week that one of London’s most famous nightclubs, Fabric, has had its licence revoked (#fabricreview). While I will avoid being overtly political, here, the closure of the nightclub inevitably prompts questions over responsibility for regulating such venues, the legitimacy of closing a popular … Continue reading “Specially youthe”: Regulating London “Venues”

Putting the Shh into Shakespeare

In our first blog post I raised the question of the defining characteristics of the sixteenth and seventeenth century playhouses: their sheer number, their architectural and performance function, their attempts to capitalise on the art of theatre, and most crucially the way they were the product of working people as financiers, artists and core audience. … Continue reading Putting the Shh into Shakespeare